Tutorial

Placement

Comments

I guess I'll say 1/3 rd rule as one point (wasnt it obvious with so much stress on it?)

The other notable thing is that he has sky occupying the top 75% of the frame capturing the mood with the red of the sun set and the dark blue & blue clouds (a good camera will capture differences like this). Also the ocean looks vast even while occupying the small portion in the lower middle. But somehow this picture does not capture my imagination. I guess its because of the every day nature of the subject.

My Comments

Looks like the turnout is reducing slowly - only one person replied (Thanks, Badri!). In any case, I'll be shooting some more mails till the responses become 0 for 4 continuous days! That should be enough to eliminate all doubt in my mind about your interest, although I hope it doesn't happen. Badri did make the right observation in that the most striking aspect in the picture is the conformity to the rule of 1/3rds. In fact, the photographer has conformed to the rule in 2 aspects.

  1. Placement of the subject.

The subject is placed right on the left third line. According to the experts, this adds a dynamism to the picture.

  1. Placement of the horizon.

The rule states that if the sky is more impressive than the land, place the horizon at the bottom third line. If the land is more impressive (or if the sky is very unimpressive - like no clouds or only gray cover), then place the horizon at the top third line. Since in this picture the sky is very impressive, the photographer has placed the horizon at the bottom third.

  1. Leading lines

The photographer has also used the concept of leading lines in this picture effectively. A leading line is a natural (like a row of trees) or artificial line (like a fence) that is present in the picture to provide a sense of depth and to draw the viewer's attention to the subject. Here, the road at the center does both.

Finally, as Badri observed, the ocean looks vast even if it occupies a very small portion of the composition. I would probably think it is because of the curve created by the bushes on the side - creating a trough-like effect.

I have attached the same picture with the 'rule of thirds' lines drawn over it to show what I mean.

About the Photographer

Rita Borg